Chamber of Secrets

Chamber of Secrets (http://www.cosforums.com/index.php)
-   The Language Lab (http://www.cosforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=13)
-   -   Beauxbatons: the place to improve your French (http://www.cosforums.com/showthread.php?t=38615)

Ludivine November 15th, 2004 5:07 am

Beauxbatons: the place to improve your French
 
Along the line of the "Improve your english" and "Improve your german" threads, I thought we needed an "Improve your french" thread too. If you have any questions about the french language, or need help, or just want to talk in french, feel free to post. Help from other french speakers is also welcome.

Kehlen Crow November 15th, 2004 11:31 am

You don't know what you're asking for. I started French two months ago and I have millions of silly questions.
(Well, I know there are NO stupid questions, there ARE stupid answers, but it doesn't really help feeling stupid when you ask these ;) )

And I'm very grateful I have someone to help me out :D

So I'll start driving you crazy, OK?
I can't print all these 'funny' letters of yours (no French keyboard, sorry), but I hope you guess it.

My first question is:
in the dictionary they say "le maitre de LA maison" for "master of the house"
but in a book I came across this: "A la table nous n'etions que quatre: le MAITRE DE maison, Philippe de Polyakoff, Cristine et moi".
Does it mean anything that LA is absent here?

lunasloony November 15th, 2004 11:46 am

I agree good thread idea!!! :D I have exams coming up so this may come in very useful when I dont feel like asking my teacher or just when im stuck!
Ooooooo, I have questions....
OK how do say (obviously in French):
1. I can't wait! (Je ne peux pas attendre, doesnt seem right!)
2. I cant wait to see you! Im looking forward to seeing you!

thanks, i would be so grateful :)!!

Ludivine November 15th, 2004 3:08 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
I can't print all these 'funny' letters of yours (no French keyboard, sorry), but I hope you guess it.

My first question is:
in the dictionary they say "le maitre de LA maison" for "master of the house"
but in a book I came across this: "A la table nous n'etions que quatre: le MAITRE DE maison, Philippe de Polyakoff, Cristine et moi".
Does it mean anything that LA is absent here?

First, the funny letters are accents.
And now for your question. You can say both and it means the same thing. In your second exemple, the "la" is absent but since it's a common expression, the "la" can be skipped. It sometimes happens in french for certain specific expressions.

Quote:

Originally Posted by lunasloony
OK how do say (obviously in French):
1. I can't wait! (Je ne peux pas attendre, doesnt seem right!)
2. I cant wait to see you! Im looking forward to seeing you!

thanks, i would be so grateful !!

1. Litteraly, the translation would be "je ne peux pas attendre", like you said but the expression is "je ne peux attendre", you just skip the "pas". You can also say "j'ai hâte" or "j'ai très hâte".

2. You can say "j'ai hâte de te voir" or "j'ai très hâte de te voir". "Très" means "a lot" and "hâte" would be like "I'm impatient". You could also say: "Je suis impatient (or impatiente depending on your gender) de te voir". You can add "très" here also if you wish. That would make "je suis très impatient(e) de te voir".

lily1993 November 15th, 2004 3:44 pm

lol, i'll help too if you want, but i think i'll be more likely asking help then actually helping...:p

Ludivine November 15th, 2004 7:15 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by lily1993
lol, i'll help too if you want, but i think i'll be more likely asking help then actually helping...:p

Your help is welcome but you need to be good in french to answer. French is my first language and I'm studing to become a teacher so I have no problem answering questions. If you need help, fell free to ask.

And for those of you who don't have a french keyboard, I'll give you some tips since accents are really important in french, it can completely change the meaning and pronounciation of a word. You can use the alt key along with a specific number (use the number pad located on the right hand side of the keyboard) in order to write letters that are not available otherwise. Here a list of the commands you'll need to write in french:

Ç : Alt 128
é : Alt 130
â : Alt 131
* : Alt 133
ç : Alt 135
ê : Alt 136
ë : Alt 137
è : Alt 138
ï : Alt 139
î : Alt 140
ô : Alt 147
û : Alt 150
ù : Alt 151
á : Alt 160
À : Alt 0192
 : Alt 0194
È : Alt 0200
É : Alt 0201
Ê : Alt 0202
Ë : Alt 0203
Î : Alt 0206
Ï : Alt 0207
Ô : Alt 0212
Ù : Alt 0217
Û : Alt 0219

crocodile November 16th, 2004 12:48 am

French learner here...I've taken the language for a year in school but it still confuses me soooo much.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ludivine
1. Litteraly, the translation would be "je ne peux pas attendre", like you said but the expression is "je ne peux attendre", you just skip the "pas". You can also say "j'ai hâte" or "j'ai très hâte".

My question is in what situation do you skip the "pas"? Also, I've seen the "ne" skipped as well, when do you skip that?

Merci beaucoup.

Azura's_Heir November 16th, 2004 1:13 am

Bonjour! I am a third year french student (well second year technically but I skipped a level) so I can help with very basic questions, but mostly I will be asking them. Glad to see that one of these threads was started for French, as I will surely be dropping in here from time to time to ask questions. :)

Ludivine November 16th, 2004 4:38 am

Quote:

Originally Posted by crocodile
French learner here...I've taken the language for a year in school but it still confuses me soooo much.

My question is in what situation do you skip the "pas"? Also, I've seen the "ne" skipped as well, when do you skip that?

Merci beaucoup.

When you want to say "I can't wait" without anything else in the sentence, we usually say "Je ne peux attendre" but if you add another part to the sentence like "je ne peux pas attendre que tu arrives" you have to use the "pas". But you can still skip it though, sometimes it sounds better, it depends if it's written or spoken. If you skip the "ne" it changes the meaning of the sentence since "je peux attendre" means "I can wait".
If you are confused, you can say "J'ai hâte" or "Je suis impatient(e)", sounds better if it's the only thing in the sentence.

lunasloony November 16th, 2004 7:17 am

THANKS, Ludivine :)!!

Kehlen Crow November 16th, 2004 3:57 pm

Wow! thank you!

Just tried your codes for letters, and that's what my computer gave me:
Ç : Alt 128 À
é : Alt 130 Â
â : Alt 131 Ã
* : Alt 133 Å
ç : Alt 135 Ç
ê : Alt 136 È
ë : Alt 137 É
è : Alt 138 Ê
ï : Alt 139 Ë
î : Alt 140 Ì
ô : Alt 147 Ó
û : Alt 150 Ö
ù : Alt 151 ×
á : Alt 160 *
À : Alt 0192 À
 : Alt 0194 Â
È : Alt 0200 È
É : Alt 0201 É
Ê : Alt 0202 Ê
Ë : Alt 0203 Ë
Î : Alt 0206 Î
Ï : Alt 0207 Ï
Ô : Alt 0212 Ô
Ù : Alt 0217 Ù
Û : Alt 0219 Û

Does everyone esle see modified A's in for first rows as I do?
This means I'll write but Uppercase accents, but it is something at least!

Another question here.
How do you use the word dÈs? (means "since" I guess).

Can I say, e.g. "dÈs 1990" ?

Ludivine November 16th, 2004 6:17 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Wow! thank you!

Just tried your codes for letters, and that's what my computer gave me:
Ç : Alt 128 À
é : Alt 130 Â
â : Alt 131 Ã
* : Alt 133 Å
ç : Alt 135 Ç
ê : Alt 136 È
ë : Alt 137 É
è : Alt 138 Ê
ï : Alt 139 Ë
î : Alt 140 Ì
ô : Alt 147 Ó
û : Alt 150 Ö
ù : Alt 151 ×
á : Alt 160 *
À : Alt 0192 À
 : Alt 0194 Â
È : Alt 0200 È
É : Alt 0201 É
Ê : Alt 0202 Ê
Ë : Alt 0203 Ë
Î : Alt 0206 Î
Ï : Alt 0207 Ï
Ô : Alt 0212 Ô
Ù : Alt 0217 Ù
Û : Alt 0219 Û

Does everyone esle see modified A's in for first rows as I do?
This means I'll write but Uppercase accents, but it is something at least!

Another question here.
How do you use the word dÈs? (means "since" I guess).

Can I say, e.g. "dÈs 1990" ?

For the alt commands, it depends what charater template your OS is using. In what language is your OS? You can also use the Windows character map found in "Start", "Programs", "Accessories", "System Tools", "Character Map". If you don't find it, you can just try to find any text in french by using Google and cut and paste the letters you need.

Now for your french question, "dès", with the accent means "since" so "dès 1990" is "since 1990".

Chloe November 17th, 2004 2:15 am

i'll be hanging out here in a week when i start french in school!

Kola_Pup November 17th, 2004 3:45 am

I've been taking french for two years and my cousins live in monteal, but i'm still confused about certain things!

how would you say, "no longer waiting" would it be ne longtemps attendre, or something like that?
sry, i kinda don't have a knack for languages

ps. would their be a 'pas' in it too?

Ludivine November 17th, 2004 8:38 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kola_Pup
I've been taking french for two years and my cousins live in monteal, but i'm still confused about certain things!

how would you say, "no longer waiting" would it be ne longtemps attendre, or something like that?
sry, i kinda don't have a knack for languages

ps. would their be a 'pas' in it too?

"No longer waiting" would be "Ne plus attendre" if you say "Ne pas attendre" it would mean "Not waiting". For example, if you say: "I will be no longer waiting for you" you would say in french: "Je ne vais plus t'attendre". If you say "I will not be waiting for you" you would say "Je ne vais pas t'attendre". "No longer" means "plus" in french not "longtemps".

Kola_Pup November 17th, 2004 9:42 pm

thanks,
yeah right after i posted that i found out i was wrong. i felt kinda stupid too cuz we had gone over that a couple monthes ago also.

anywho, thanks for the help anyway

Melodic November 17th, 2004 10:34 pm

I just have one quick question. I'm in French II and we haven't done past tense yet and I think I have an idea of how to do it from watching subtitles but I want to make sure.
Do you use a conjugated form of avoir, then a verb with an é on the end instead of er? Like, J'ai étudié français. Do I have that right?

Also, what does mettre mean exactly? I haven't done -re or -ir verbs yet except être and avoir.

DragonBlk17 November 17th, 2004 10:42 pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Melodic
I just have one quick question. I'm in French II and we haven't done past tense yet and I think I have an idea of how to do it from watching subtitles but I want to make sure.
Do you use a conjugated form of avoir, then a verb with an é on the end instead of er? Like, J'ai étudié français. Do I have that right?

Also, what does mettre mean exactly? I haven't done -re or -ir verbs yet except être and avoir.

Yes I think that's right. Because if you had J'ai etudier francais then it would be "I studying French" So it's right.

Atashi November 17th, 2004 11:01 pm

Heh, I'm majoring in French, but I still suck at it.. I think so, anyway. ^^;;; I'll help if I can, though.

Ludivine November 18th, 2004 7:42 am

Quote:

Originally Posted by Melodic
I just have one quick question. I'm in French II and we haven't done past tense yet and I think I have an idea of how to do it from watching subtitles but I want to make sure.
Do you use a conjugated form of avoir, then a verb with an é on the end instead of er? Like, J'ai étudié français. Do I have that right?

Also, what does mettre mean exactly? I haven't done -re or -ir verbs yet except être and avoir.

You're almost right. It's "J'ai étudié le français". You just forgot the article "le" and we almost always put an article before nouns in french. "J'ai étudié le français" would be one of the past tenses we have in french.

This is "passé composé" (composed past would be a way to translate it since it's composed of two parts). The first part is the one that is conjugated (the "auxiliaire conjugué") and the second part is the "participe passé" can change according to the subject or the "complément d'objet direct" (or C.O.D. for short) which is the word the verb is refering to directly.

To find what is the "complément d'objet direct" in a sentence, you can ask yourself a simple question. Here's an example: "Je mange des pommes" (or "I am eating apples"). To find the "complément d'objet direct, you can ask yourself "Qu'est-ce que je mange?" or "What am I eating?". The answer is "des pommes" or "apples" so "pommes" is the "complément d'objet direct".

If the "auxiliaire conjugué" is "avoir" it changes according to the "complément d'objet direct" but only if it is before the verb. For example, you would say "J'ai eu des livres" which means "I had books" or "Les livres que j'ai eus" which means "The books that I had".

If the "auxiliaire conjugué is "être", than the "participe passé" changes according to the subject of the verb, no matter where he is in the sentence. For example, you would say "Je suis allé * l'école" which means "I went to school" if you're a guy and "je suis allée * l'école" if you're a girl.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Atashi
Heh, I'm majoring in French, but I still suck at it.. I think so, anyway. ^^;;; I'll help if I can, though.

Thanks Atashi, your help is welcome.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 6:19 pm.

Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Original content is Copyright © MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright © its respective owners.