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Beauxbatons: the place to improve your French



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  #481  
Old December 15th, 2005, 1:34 am
Besanamo  Female.gif Besanamo is offline
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Thanks, murmure, Ringquelle!
I actually don't have as many problems with irreguar verbs as I do with regular verbs because we always study those. It's the regular rules that the teachers don't pay enough attention to teaching us in my experience. I've got a good teacher this hyear though.

On another note, I was wondering if you could recommend some french literature. We've just finished Bonjour Tristesse by Francoise Sagan and will soon start La vie devant soi by Romain Gary as well as Le malade imaginaire by Moliere, we've also done books like Le petit prince. So if you can recommend me anything that isn't to hard to understand and not to long, that I could read over the holidyas or so, to practise my french, that would be great. Thanks for all your help! I appreciate it!


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  #482  
Old December 15th, 2005, 2:38 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Hey guys,
I am reading this story in French (it's a Maigret mystery), and I can understand most of it, but so far there is this one long annoying sentence that is confusing me:

"Jamais personne, dans les annales de la police, ne mit autant d'acharnement ou de coquetterie √* se montrer sous toutes ses faces, √* poser en quelque sorte des heures durant, seize heures d'affil√©e exactement, √* attirer, volontairement ou non, l'attention de dizaines de personnes √* telle enseigne que l'inspecteur Janvier, alert√©, alla regerder l'homme sous le nez."

This is actually the very first sentence of the story if you can believe it, and I just skipped over it and went on because it was confusing for me. It is just so long that I lose the meaning somehow. Maybe someone could help me? I appreciate it!

p.s. I've been taking French for quite a while now (I took the very basics in 4th grade or so, and then I started again about 2 years ago), and I love it. I am pretty good at understanding and reading. I have more trouble writing and speaking. I enjoy it anyway.


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Last edited by Cadia; December 15th, 2005 at 2:49 am.
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  #483  
Old December 15th, 2005, 3:03 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

"Jamais personne, dans les annales de la police, ne mit autant d'acharnement ou de coquetterie √* se montrer sous toutes ses faces, √* poser en quelque sorte des heures durant, seize heures d'affil√©e exactement, √* attirer, volontairement ou non, l'attention de dizaines de personnes √* telle enseigne que l'inspecteur Janvier, alert√©, alla regerder l'homme sous le nez."

No one, in the police's history, had ever put that much relentlessness and coquetry in showing themself under all their aspects, to somehow pose for hours, precisely 16 in a row, to attract, voluntarily or not, the attention of dozens of people in such a way that inspector Janvier, alarmed, went to look at the man under the nose.

The sentence underlined is because I don't get it... Why would the man go looking at the man under his nose... I think it might be some kind of expression, but I'm French and I haven't got a clue so... Anyway, that's my translation, there might be others as no translation is ever the same, but I think it might be pretty accurate.. cept for the looking at the man under the nose... weird sentence...
Oh and btw, the des dizaines is not dozens, it's just that dizaines is translated by about 10, and it wouldn't have meant the same thing...


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  #484  
Old December 15th, 2005, 3:07 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Besanamo
Thanks, murmure, Ringquelle!
I actually don't have as many problems with irreguar verbs as I do with regular verbs because we always study those. It's the regular rules that the teachers don't pay enough attention to teaching us in my experience. I've got a good teacher this hyear though.

On another note, I was wondering if you could recommend some french literature. We've just finished Bonjour Tristesse by Francoise Sagan and will soon start La vie devant soi by Romain Gary as well as Le malade imaginaire by Moliere, we've also done books like Le petit prince. So if you can recommend me anything that isn't to hard to understand and not to long, that I could read over the holidyas or so, to practise my french, that would be great. Thanks for all your help! I appreciate it!
Are you looking for french literature or just books in french? Because if it's literature you want, like classic stuff, there's always Victor Hugo, but his stuff's normally very long... If you want a good book, there's Ces enfants d'ailleurs by Arlette Cousture which I love.. It's about kids from Poland during WWII and the immigrate to Canada... if really good!


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  #485  
Old December 15th, 2005, 3:35 am
Besanamo  Female.gif Besanamo is offline
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Audreetee
Are you looking for french literature or just books in french? Because if it's literature you want, like classic stuff, there's always Victor Hugo, but his stuff's normally very long... If you want a good book, there's Ces enfants d'ailleurs by Arlette Cousture which I love.. It's about kids from Poland during WWII and the immigrate to Canada... if really good!
I was looking for books in general that are written in french. Something fun and not to hard to read. So I can get more used to french while enjoying a good story. The one you suggested sounds good, especially since I moved to Canada a bit over a year ago and am pretty close to Quebec. I might even be able to find it in the library. That would be great. Do you happen to know how it works ordering french books from Ontario or any other non-french place. Does it work pretty much the same as for other books? The ones I've got have always been ordered over the school. But I guess I can always just drive the half hour to a book store on the Quebec side of the river and actually use my french while being there.

On another topic, I always have problems understanding numbers in french, if in a store or a hotel. I mostly just give money and see what I get back. Is there anyway I could better this, I understand all the numbers if they're written, I just have problems orally. If I ask someone to repeat it they always write it down on a piece of paper which doesn't help me learn, so any suggestions would be appreciated.


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  #486  
Old December 15th, 2005, 4:58 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Audreetee
"Jamais personne, dans les annales de la police, ne mit autant d'acharnement ou de coquetterie √* se montrer sous toutes ses faces, √* poser en quelque sorte des heures durant, seize heures d'affil√©e exactement, √* attirer, volontairement ou non, l'attention de dizaines de personnes √* telle enseigne que l'inspecteur Janvier, alert√©, alla regerder l'homme sous le nez."

No one, in the police's history, had ever put that much relentlessness and coquetry in showing themself under all their aspects, to somehow pose for hours, precisely 16 in a row, to attract, voluntarily or not, the attention of dozens of people in such a way that inspector Janvier, alarmed, went to look at the man under the nose.

The sentence underlined is because I don't get it... Why would the man go looking at the man under his nose... I think it might be some kind of expression, but I'm French and I haven't got a clue so... Anyway, that's my translation, there might be others as no translation is ever the same, but I think it might be pretty accurate.. cept for the looking at the man under the nose... weird sentence...
Oh and btw, the des dizaines is not dozens, it's just that dizaines is translated by about 10, and it wouldn't have meant the same thing...
Thank you very much for that, it saves me a bit of frustration. I appreciate it very much! About the "under the nose" part: there is a note there in the book and it says: "regarder l'homme sous le nez: have a good look at the man." sorry, I probably should have mentioned that before.
Thanks again!


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  #487  
Old December 15th, 2005, 12:15 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by hermionefille
I've taken several years of French, and really enjoy it and reading HP in French. I'm doing a history project on a Roman Emperor, and all the sites are in French. Can anyone tell me the ways to say "AD" and "BC" in French. (Send me an owl if you don't mind). My french-English dictionary nor the internet sites seem to be able to tell me.
here's your aswer, later better than never !

AD # après Jésus-Christ, par apr. J.-C. ou apr. J-C
BC # avant Jésus-Christ, par av. J.-C. ou av. J-C
We also use, AD ="de notre ère" or BC "avant notre ère"


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  #488  
Old December 15th, 2005, 5:19 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Besanamo
I was looking for books in general that are written in french. Something fun and not to hard to read. So I can get more used to french while enjoying a good story. The one you suggested sounds good, especially since I moved to Canada a bit over a year ago and am pretty close to Quebec. I might even be able to find it in the library. That would be great. Do you happen to know how it works ordering french books from Ontario or any other non-french place. Does it work pretty much the same as for other books? The ones I've got have always been ordered over the school. But I guess I can always just drive the half hour to a book store on the Quebec side of the river and actually use my french while being there.

On another topic, I always have problems understanding numbers in french, if in a store or a hotel. I mostly just give money and see what I get back. Is there anyway I could better this, I understand all the numbers if they're written, I just have problems orally. If I ask someone to repeat it they always write it down on a piece of paper which doesn't help me learn, so any suggestions would be appreciated.
I guess you can always order online, you can try at amazon.ca though the books might all be in english, and also http://www.archambault.ca/store/default.asp although I don't know if they deliver as far as where you live...

For the numbers, I guess it's just a matter of hearing them but I guess when people tell you how much money something costs, they don't really think you don't speak French as a first language and say it pretty quickly or something... Maybe try to practise with someone who speaks French as a first language (if you know one) or you can try to practise with this site http://french.about.com/library/begin/bl-numbers.htm I don't know if it helps..


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  #489  
Old December 15th, 2005, 5:20 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by le_canard
AD # après Jésus-Christ, par apr. J.-C. ou apr. J-C
BC # avant Jésus-Christ, par av. J.-C. ou av. J-C
We also use, AD ="de notre ère" or BC "avant notre ère"
Wow, that's very interesting, I never knew that before. I had another question: what does "mastic" mean? My dictionary says "putty/filler" but that doesn't make any sense in the sentence it is in. Is there another meaning?

A note to those in France: if you want you can vote in the magical location device thread (linked in my signature), which is a thread with a poll to get some statistics on what countries HP fans are from. You can either vote anonomously or post to say what you voted...


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Last edited by Cadia; December 15th, 2005 at 5:23 pm.
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  #490  
Old December 15th, 2005, 7:24 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

well if the word is Mastique, as in the verb mastiquer, it means to chew, to masticate.. but if really the word is mastic, then it really is only putty or cement


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  #491  
Old December 16th, 2005, 4:06 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Audreetee
well if the word is Mastique, as in the verb mastiquer, it means to chew, to masticate.. but if really the word is mastic, then it really is only putty or cement
I asked my teacher today and she said that in this instance it meant tidying up...well, she said it actually meant "mess" but if it was "l'heure du mastic" or something it could be an expression that could mean tidying up. I find that really wierd, but, whatever. Has anyone ever heard of that? maybe it's a really old-fashioned expression or something?


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  #492  
Old December 16th, 2005, 4:39 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Besanamo
I was looking for books in general that are written in french. Something fun and not to hard to read. So I can get more used to french while enjoying a good story. The one you suggested sounds good, especially since I moved to Canada a bit over a year ago and am pretty close to Quebec. I might even be able to find it in the library. That would be great. Do you happen to know how it works ordering french books from Ontario or any other non-french place. Does it work pretty much the same as for other books? The ones I've got have always been ordered over the school. But I guess I can always just drive the half hour to a book store on the Quebec side of the river and actually use my french while being there.
I'm reading Les Trois Mousquetaires (The Three Musketeers) by Alexandre Dumas right now, though in English since I didn't know where to get a French version and I was afraid that it might be hard, but I ask my teacher about it and he said that it's written in a pretty easy-to-read style, so that sounds like a good bet.

edit: I just had a thought. If you live in a city with a university that has a big library, you might be able to check it out from them. I just looked it up at UCSD's library, and they had it (in French), so hopefully that'll work for you, too. It just saved me a bunch of money, considering Amazon.fr charges 11€ for shipping to the U.S...



Last edited by Eir; December 16th, 2005 at 4:59 am.
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  #493  
Old December 16th, 2005, 5:58 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Audreetee
I guess you can always order online, you can try at amazon.ca though the books might all be in english, and also http://www.archambault.ca/store/default.asp although I don't know if they deliver as far as where you live...

For the numbers, I guess it's just a matter of hearing them but I guess when people tell you how much money something costs, they don't really think you don't speak French as a first language and say it pretty quickly or something... Maybe try to practise with someone who speaks French as a first language (if you know one) or you can try to practise with this site http://french.about.com/library/begin/bl-numbers.htm I don't know if it helps..
I think I'm going to try the book store or the library first. If that's not an option, I'll check if I can get them online.
The number website is good though, I'm going to use that to practice. It's really cool. Thanks a lot for the link!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eir
I'm reading Les Trois Mousquetaires (The Three Musketeers) by Alexandre Dumas right now, though in English since I didn't know where to get a French version and I was afraid that it might be hard, but I ask my teacher about it and he said that it's written in a pretty easy-to-read style, so that sounds like a good bet.

edit: I just had a thought. If you live in a city with a university that has a big library, you might be able to check it out from them. I just looked it up at UCSD's library, and they had it (in French), so hopefully that'll work for you, too. It just saved me a bunch of money, considering Amazon.fr charges 11‚ā¨ for shipping to the U.S...
I've actually thought about reading that before, but then forgot about it. Thanks for reminding me and thanks for the tip as well, eventhough I doubt I'm alllowed to borrow books from the univesity. But I could of course always ask my friend to do so. I think I'll ask him and check in the public library and the bookstore.

In french class we are currently wtaching "La chambre des officiers" if anyone has seen that. It's a french film about the story of an officer during World War I.


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  #494  
Old December 16th, 2005, 6:08 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

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Originally Posted by Eir

edit: I just had a thought. If you live in a city with a university that has a big library, you might be able to check it out from them. I just looked it up at UCSD's library, and they had it (in French), so hopefully that'll work for you, too. It just saved me a bunch of money, considering Amazon.fr charges 11‚ā¨ for shipping to the U.S...
You could try amazon.ca... it's canadian so they might have a few books in french and it won't cost you a bunch of euros but can$...


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  #495  
Old December 16th, 2005, 2:00 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

I studied French up to university level and lived there for a while... and I still get my grammar mixed up!


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  #496  
Old December 16th, 2005, 10:19 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

well I'm french-canadian and I still make grammar mistakes so that's because you're only human!


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  #497  
Old December 16th, 2005, 10:49 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eir
edit: I just had a thought. If you live in a city with a university that has a big library, you might be able to check it out from them. I just looked it up at UCSD's library, and they had it (in French), so hopefully that'll work for you, too. It just saved me a bunch of money, considering Amazon.fr charges 11€ for shipping to the U.S...
Amazon.com will also have some French books. Maybe not something too obsure, but they do have alot, and that way you dont have to pay the excessive shipping charges. That's how I bought my French Harry Potter.


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  #498  
Old December 17th, 2005, 12:25 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

I'm useless with accents. I either put them on the wrong letters, put the wrong accent on, or miss them out altogether.


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  #499  
Old December 17th, 2005, 12:27 am
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

lol accents go with pronunciation so it's really just a matter of listening to people talk and actually practising... It's the same in English with stresses on certain syllables it's just that they're not written in English...


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Old December 17th, 2005, 1:01 pm
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Re: Beauxbatons, the place to improve your french

Ooh, accents *shudders*
I never got the knack of them. I really can't see the difference between ¬ī and `. Although I did figure out not long ago that ^ often indicates that originally, there used to be an s after the vowel. Am I right?


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